The book of all books?

If a K engine can sell for 41K then for heavens sake, what will this little dealer book sell for? Now, this is one cool book. And if you judge a book by its cover, its insane cool. This cover is amazing. It looks like its engraved, or embossed hand painted leather! Hard to tell in the crappy photos. But man oh man!

Thanks for the thumb photo! AHHHHHHH

It appears from the sellers comment, that his father was thinking of becoming a Chris-Craft dealer back in the day, so is this is possibly the type of brochure used to sell a dealership. And thats the all out best of the best from a budget standpoint. The design dept and marketing dept, would have pulled out all the stops on the cover. And now, a bazillion years later, proof that it was the right call.

Factory Photos

Cool stuff

And that cover art! If you own a 1930 CC, maybe this is your scrap book cover for shows.

The book is worth more than it was new! Heck I bet the entire printing budget was smaller than this. BTW, in 1930 days, CURRENT BID $300 would be. A whopping $20 smackaroos. Which I suppose was a huge meeting to discuss.
YOU CAN SEE IT ALL HERE ON eBay!

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4 Responses to “Oh, This Little Book Is Gonna Cost Ya!”
  1. Tuobanur

    That’s cool, would be interesting to see what you get nowadays for a CC franchise book.

  2. Jim Staib

    A photo of a Hydroplane. Do any real ones exist? It was $7200. What was a house or what kind of car was in that price range?

    • m-fine

      “In 1930 average new house cost $7,145.00 and by 1939 was $3,800.00 More.
      In 1930 the average income per year was $1,970.00 and by 1939 was $1,730.00.
      In 1930 a gallon of gas was 10 cents and by 1939 was 10 cents.”

  3. Mark in Ohio (sometimes da U.P.)

    The reason the economy didn’t get any better between 1929 to 1939 was because of the Great Depression. WWII had not started yet which sadly but greatly improved the economy. If the economy had been better in the 30s we would have a lot more old neat wooden boats to buy and sell and admire. I was lucky enough to be raised by parents who had grown up during the depression. Although the economy was much better in the 50s they never forgot the 30s. They instilled in all of us kids the value of a dollar, and how to stretch it.