Just needs a little paint

Deep in the old ebay listings you may have missed this cruiser in Seattle. Its a double enclosed model, and as they say in the real estate world. Obsolete space. Like having a dinning room and living room. It’s not how we live anymore, nor how we boat. BUT! This one is worthy of a second look.

Amazing lines

The owners spent over $400K on it so far. Yup, that’s what is says. NEW bottom.. And maybe more. Says the two 427’s need to be rebuilt, so not sure what that’s about. At this point chuck two 454’s in it and move on.

Sell the 427’s

New Bottom

And according to the listing, Needs mostly paint and varnish. So. Lets say you get it for 35K then spend your own time on it. Two 454’s is $30K when all in.. Now it’s $65K in it. Shipping it to let’s just say Reedville. $10K Okay now $75K and then factor in other work on it $10K, now $85K and you have one killer cruiser.

Reedville or Bust?

Thats an extension cord

BEFORE and AFTER?

Or, a Cruiser that your wife will be a killer. BUT, you will have a boat to live on. And you cant find a nice water front house for $85K? Yup. See.. Sea?
YOU CAN BUY YOUR NEW HOME HERE!

OR? If you want already done, not a Double Enclosed, but all done and a more modern set up. There is this perfect Commander at Freedom Boat Service for slightly more, or less than you would spend. And in here is the conundrum.

1953 Chris-Craft – 35′ – Commander also restored in Seattle JUST CLICK HERE

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18 Responses to “$400,000 Spent, Yours For $35,000”
  1. Runabout36

    There’s $400,000 grand in it already! Where? For that money it should be pristine. Somebody got hosed.

    Reply
  2. Rob

    Twin 140’s push this boat to 38 knots?????? I am skeptical. Our 35′ 1937 (also a semiplaning hull) has twin 135’s and topped out at 18.5 knots. I do like the boat though.

    Reply
  3. Stenz

    $400k already spent? I don’t see it, but……what a beautiful vessel. Can you imagine the crowd she would draw at the dock in 1941? I hope she can again soon.

    Reply
  4. Rob

    I may be off base, but I wonder if this is the boat which had it’s bottom work documented on Boat Buzz. That would be four or five years ago if memory serves. I looked but could not quickly find the thread, which was extensive. I think the thread was called Tango Uniform. Lots of work done and seemingly of very good craftsmanship. However, not all the original inner planking was replaced with plywood, which is consistent with the pictures in the add that show both types. If this is the same boat, the work is there and documented. But $400k… wuff.

    Reply
    • Captain Nemo

      I think you’re right Rob, I remember the thread. The work done did seem to be of good quality and well documented.
      The guy who posted the thread, I think, turned out to be a bit of a kook started posting inappropriate pics, the thread ended up getting pulled.

      Reply
  5. Captain Nemo

    I think this thing would be finished or at least further along with that kind money spent.
    If it weren’t on the other side of the continent I might consider this.

    Reply
  6. John Rothert

    Well the double cabins were, in my experience, light in the scantlings…almost like the early commuters that shed weight for speed. Obviously someone has mistakenly added a zero to the amount previously expended…maybe two. Still she looks clean in the bilges and has real potential. The current price is too much given the need to rebuild the “side oilers” (which when removed might be worth more than the hull). The second boat is a real beauty but the current, recent, and future market price of a boat like that is less, way less, than half the asking price. All this OPINION is offered by me…one of the last cruiser guys. Hope they find good stewards and worthy homes……John in Va.

    Reply
  7. Dan T

    Rare boat and probably is the last pre-war double cabin of her size. Should be preserved and displayed in a museum. Great history there.

    Reply
  8. Sunday Funday

    I had to laugh at Matt’s comment that the finished boat @ $140K is only “slightly” more dollars than finishing this one at his estimate of $85K.
    I understand his point, but only us “boat guys” would call $55k slightly more! I think we’ve all made similar comments!

    Reply
  9. Dan T

    Just checked the listing again. Currently at $25,000. Those 427s have gotta be worth more than a few bucks?

    Reply
  10. Randy

    Having gone through something like this myself, I know just how quickly you can ‘burn thru’ $100k and still not be much further along than when you started. And at that point you think you are in too deep to stop so you continue, and continue, and …….. Structural repairs are notabily expensive due to the efforts to get access to framing, stringers, etc., and this is the most important part of a restoration. I have seen cruisers that cosmetically looked great on the outside, but once you start looking behind ‘furniture’ or dig around in machinery spaces you get the true story. These kinds of ‘restorations’ cannot fool good surveyors and the $$$’s spent are essentially wasted.

    You really need to be in love, or have a LOT of sentimental attachment, with a project like this. I was with mine, plus also had the time to drag out the expense ’til it was finished.

    Reply
  11. Dick Dow

    If anyone has questions about the Commander shown, that is “Itchin”, the vessel Ron Stevenson and I owned and restored several years ago. I did all the mechanical and electronic upgrades – and will be happy to share the information. The boat deserves a new owner – It’s a shame it’s sitting, not cruising as it was built to do.

    Reply
  12. Jimmy

    I’d rebuild the 427’s because you could completely rebuild both those engines for a new pair 454’s and as a bonus saying your boat has 427’s sounds a lot cooler than having a pair of plain 454’s. If they’re FE blocks they’re still not worth a lot since the only FE part is the bare block and you need a machinist to drill the block and turn it into a sideoiler.

    Reply

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