Whats next is the whole point I suppose. It’s all about saving fossil fuel and the planet so there is a whats next. The folks at Edison Marine have pulled it off. This is a 30Mph rocket. Can last up to 8 hrs on one charge…. OK it’s only cruising at 5 mph doing that. But… And if you run out of juice, there aint no old geezer in a fish’n boat gonna be able to help. But that’s not the point. It’s about being cool and earth friendly. I love this. Now if you don’t mind, I need to go to work… in my electric Porsche Speedster..

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3 Responses to “Electric Classic Boats. Dear God, What's Next?”
  1. Rick Gambino

    Well this is all well and fine but if I want to hear an electric motor I’ll turn on my blender and make margharitas. Give me the rumble of my old B engine through its copper exhaust any day.

  2. Editor

    HAAAAAA! That is priceless, one of the reasons I love my old boats is the sound. There is NOTHING like the sound of a flat heat. Same with some of the old airplanes. You can hear the difference miles away.

  3. Anonymous

    For the comparitively low hours of annual use these boats get, I would suggest that the cost and operational limitations of this set up are rather weakly justified. I must admit to being a purist, and I don’t quite get all the re-productions of these boats, when a properly maintained original can provide acceptable service for the majority of applications. Plus, originals normally (just not now!) go up in value and have an appeal that is inarguable. The first thing people ask me about my BB is “is it original”. I “get” an electic re-production even less than I do a conventionally powered one.

    Where does the electricity to power all the future electric cars, boats, etc. come from? Likely the coal fired plant in someone else’s back yard.