POW pOw pow pow!

POW pOw pow pow!

As many of us are starting to winterize our engines, we here at Woody Boater thought it might be fun to celebrate our beloved, or not, engines. So today, hone up on your math and leave us a shot of your magnificent collection of motors. OH, and here is a fun question of the day. Whats the difference between a Motor, and an engine? Happy commenting.

Just another day at Katzs Marina

Just another day at Katzs Marina

Just another day at the antique boat center.

Just another day at the antique boat center.

More coolness at the Antique Boat Center

More coolness at the Antique Boat Center

How about a snazzed up new outboard.

How about a snazzed up new outboard.

A huge Packard!

A huge Packard!

Nice detailed flathead

Nice detailed flathead

Yup, even those little battery toy jobs.

Yup, even those little battery toy jobs.

 

Original Cadillac duel quad love.

Original Cadillac duel quad love.

Bone original untouched Chris Craft M

Bone original untouched Chris Craft M

You can even send us you work in progress. Head gasket change

You can even send us you work in progress. Head gasket change.

Post your engine love. remeber, keep the shots under 1mg in size so they will load. And the math problem for you new guys is to stop spam!

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92 Responses to “It’s Engine Day, Show Us Your Juggs!”
    • Troy

      And here it the 175 HP MCL in the Cadillac built Yorktown.

      I do love those updraft Zenith’s.

  1. Sean

    Here’s the original 165 IL six workhorse from the 72 Greavette. Usually bulletproof but, this one had taken one for the cause

  2. don vogt

    Here’s a 1938 KA engine, with the original aluminum head. In addition to the unique head, the exhaust elbow is set at a different angle from the normal K series of that era, I believe.

  3. Turbanur

    Motors run on electricity, engines run on fuel.

    My engine will be going in soon.

  4. Dan Ward

    I looked it up, here ya go:

    A motor is a machine that converts other forms of energy into mechanical energy and so imparts motion.

    An engine is a motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical work.

    So an engine is a specific type of motor. That’s why it’s not incorrect to speak of a motorboat, or a motorcar, or a motor speedway, even if the boat or car is clearly powered by combustion.

    Note that if there’s no combustion, there’s no engine. Purely electric cars don’t have engines.

  5. Alex

    Here’s a favorite pic of mine. This is Warren Keller, working on my Scripps 208 (from “The Majestic”).

    Warren is a mid-70 year old, old school mechanic. By old school, I mean he’s not classroom-taught. He’s workbench, under-hood, in-the-bilge taught.

    Warren fixes and services engines not with manuals or electronic aids, but using all his senses, including intuition.

    He figured out the simplest yet most elusive cause of water-in-the-oil in this Scripps. The repair cost? About $5. (And no, none of the common culprits was responsible.)

    So in posting this engine photo, I’m also paying tribute to Warren and his rare and diminishing breed.

  6. Rick

    Recently I was given this Evinrude Fleetwin. It belonged to the uncle of a friend of an acquaintance. The gentleman passed away and they were going to throw it out when they remembered that I had a old CC in my driveway and thought I might like to have it. The back story is the uncle would take this by car to a row boat rental and then go out fishing. It is unrestored but everything moves and appears to have been well taken care of in the day. There is a repair ticket attached from when it was last serviced stating it was unable to idle. The bill was for $17. I have not has the chance to run it yet. I also have the original Operating Manual, list of Evinrude Distributors, a panphlet from the Outboard Boating Club of America and an intact return envelope for joining that club.

  7. Alex

    Here’s the 427 Ford in “Scotch.” Maybe not one of the fanciest engines, but clearly one of the greats. Only 136 original hours on it. Ahhh the sound when the secondaries open!

  8. Alex

    Last pic from me. Here’s the original 1929-1930 Willys Overland motor in “HAL.” Makes 31 hp at 2,800 rpm. Original motor in totally unrestored boat.

    [BTW, if anyone can tell me what the function is of that coffee can-looking contraption in the engine bay, I’d appreciate it. We pump it (with a gas line bulb) full of fuel to make the engine run. After a while, it seems to empty, so needs to be pumped full again. Kinda (ok, very) scary. My only idea is that it’s some sort of gravity feed fuel system that’s not working right.

    Anyhow, this motor is why I don’t laugh at the Chris-Craft B, which makes 2x the power and runs way better.

    • Rick

      You must be the only one not to laugh at a B, I laugh at my B wishing I had more power, I mean really, it uses lawnmower sparkplugs! HAL is a way cool boat, really can’t repower her.

    • Guy Clements

      Alex; Your can there is what most old car people refer to as a “Vacuum tank”. Common on a lot of cars in the teens thru the thirties. They are fairly simple inside, just pull the screws around the top perimeter, and lift the top out of the tank. You will find a spring loaded mechanism that a large brass float pushes up against. The tank uses engine vacuum to pull fuel from the main tank to fill the vacuum tank, and when it is up to level it snaps over center to block off the engine vacuum and vents the tank so that the fuel can gravity flow to the carburetor. Good luck.

    • John Ferguson

      That canister is an old vacuum fuel delivery system designed for old carbs that require gravity feed. There not too hard to repair.
      John Ferguson / Ferguson’s Garage

    • roy

      That is an autovac. Vacuum pulls gas into the chamber until full and then a float inside activates a release valve to release vacuum. Once the float falls then the vacuum again pulls fuel until full. ingenious idea. My 32 Royce still has a functioning unit. Just needed cork seals about twenty years back.
      If you don’t hear the vacuum release every once in a while, you know you are either out of fuel in the main tank or the autovac isn’t functioning.

  9. Ol'Salt

    If it is an engine, why do we keep it in a motor box? Here is the 331 Hemi we spent all last winter rebuilding.

    • jon weller

      Have a professional rebuilt 1954 Chrysler Hemi w/ 60 hr. on it. Runs great. Interested? Jon

  10. don vogt

    here is an engine that i found interesting at the ’11 tahoe show. cant remember what it was but maybe Brian R. or someone else can identify.

  11. Chuck Crosby

    Model K in 1947 chris craft deluxe runabout….purchased the boat with a crack in the block, took much longer than I planned to rebuilt and get the boat in the water….Since sold her

  12. Doug Ward

    This boat was a Show Winner for “Best Contemporary” at the 2013 Geneva Lakes Boat Show.

    1980 Millerick Brothers Boat Works Edwardian Fantail Motor Launch, “Pink Hour”

    Power – 3-Cylinder, 20 Horsepower Easthope Gas Engine

    Engine comes complete with a Glass Cover.

  13. Doug Ward

    Here is a Interceptor Engine that was in a 1965 Century Resorter. Boat name is “Albatross”.

    Photo taken at the 2012 ACBS Madison Area Antique & Classic Boat Show.

    When viewing don’t forget your sunglasses.

  14. Sean

    I met this guy on FB that is marinizing a Jaguar V12 for his woody…. Can’t wait to see how this turns out!

    • Cobourg Kid

      Between 1916 and 1921, the Toronto based “Heldena II” captured two world records, including the title of fastest displacement hull in the world, when she was clocked at just over 42 mph. Originally equipped with a straight 8, 225 HP Van Blerck engine she was re-powered in 1919 with a CC Smith Twin Six Liberty V-12.

  15. Cobourg Kid

    Based on surplus WW1 Liberty aircraft engines the “twin six” engines were marinized by the C. C. Smith Boat &
    Engine Co. plant in Algonac, Michigan in early 1920s and offered for sale to buyers such as Gar Wood. Here’s a vintage ad for the “twin Six”.

  16. Grant Stanfield

    95-hp Chris*Craft Model ‘K’ in our unrestored boathouse beauty DENBY: SK-22-169, a 1954 CC 22′ Sea Skiff. Runs quite nicely- still very stock.

  17. fredster

    1958 Ford Y-block, 312 ci., with the sidedraft carbs. Very responsive, but liked to start fires!. Dropped this one in a Correct Craft Debonnaire, sweet boat, handled like a sports car.

  18. Antique Boat Museum

    The Antique Boat Museum is partnering with ACBS for their spring symposium. This year the Theme is ENGINES!! SO save the day May 2-4, 2014. More details to come.

  19. Doug Pope

    This is a ’65 200 CI, 120 HP Ford that I put in the 21′ plywood utility I just finished. It came out of a Lyman from New Hampshire and it got a complete rebuild from Thomaston Boat and Motor Works.

  20. Greg Lewandowski

    Jimmuh, are those a pair of turbochargers on that engine? How about some more explanation on that one.

  21. 'Bone Daddy' Deems

    Yes, yes I know I know, I caught hell for all of the chrome…1962 Corvette 327 for my 1954 C.C. Riviera, or see below for the original Herc MBL…which one should do? decisions, decisions…..”Bone Daddy”

    • Rick

      I’d put the Herc. in the boat and that chromed beauty back into a ’62 Vette and display them both. Did they do a split window in ’62 or only ’63?

    • Alex

      Is this the one that starts with: “It was the worst of times, it was the worst of times.”

  22. Bob Ulrich

    I know it’s an outboard but I haven’t gotten to my Century w/283 yet. This is my restored “62 Evinrude “80 HP”. I hid an 80 hp inside the ’62 housing so it would be closer to the ’60 Wagemaker I have it on.

  23. John D

    Great Timing – nearly complete refurbish of my 1957 392 Hemi. Re-install planned for next week.

  24. Roger Martin

    Here you see a vintage 1958 Owens 25′ cabin cruiser with a nice 283 chevy flagship motor. This boat has been in storage for 40 years inside of a building and is now in the process of resurrecting. Great barn find that just needs a little TLC.

    • pietro

      dear roger I am restoring a 1957 283, it is same as your. exhaust manifolds are stil ok (!!!), but I need endplate and elbow gaskets: can you help me?

  25. Eric

    Restored ’54 Johnson 25hp on my preserved ’54 Penn Yan Swift. It’s been a part of my family since the mid 80’s and used often. Just winterized it and put in the barn this afternoon.

  26. Mike Green

    Here is the engine that’s in Topper a 1929 28′ Chris Craft Sedan The engine is an original Chris Craft A70 825 ci 90 degree V8 with duel spark plugs per cylinder. make about 225hp not bad for 1929

    • Bob Ulrich

      Beautiful Danny. Didn’t I see that at the St. Michael’s show this year?

      Bob

      • Danny B

        Thanks Bob – you sure did see it there. I’m local to that area so it’s there every year. Your ’62 looks great. Love those hoods.

        • Bob Ulrich

          Thanks appreciate that. I actually like the Golden Jubilee Fat Fifty I have better but wanted more power and didn’t want to go through the hassle of figuring out how to do the power cable for the 80 hp through the ’59 housing.

  27. lee wangstad

    I’ll give this a shot, see if my math is correct. A General Motors diesel marine engine, 1946. I’d like to have one just standing out in the yard, fire it up at will and run some appliances with it. Just a little something for the neighbors to worry about.

  28. Jeffrey J.

    My Marine Power 350K (early-mid 70’s Roamer starb.) ready to go in my NEW 18-1/2 foot cold-mold mahogany runabout. Having a flip party this next weekend. Hope to be in the water later this next summer!!!

  29. Northshore Doug

    1940’s Michigan marine flathead ford V8 conversion in our 1936 18ft split cockpit

    • Doug

      Hi !
      Nice work on the Jaguar Engine. I am just stating to acquire items for a Glen L Belle Isle. I just purchased a 1941 Lincoln Zephyr V12 Flathead. Can you suggest a resource for marinizing this engine? I hope to fabricate most of the items myself but I need to know what needs to be done.
      Thanks!