Screen Shot 2014-01-17 at 8.02.26 PM

The Price Guide from Hagerty marine insurance has been around for a while, but as spring is just a couple weather reports away, you might be finding yourself hunting around for a cool boat all over the place. You are also finding that pricing is all over the place. Well, the Hagerty Price Guide is a good place to start.

Screen Shot 2014-01-17 at 8.03.55 PM

Oh sure, there are the insane restored ones out there that defy pricing, and then there is the “Alex Watson 25 Sportsman issue” But other than that, its darn good reading. Remember though it’s a guide, a use full guide to restore, buy or sell with. Restore you say? Yup.. So you find a old sea skiff in a old guys garage, he sells it to ya for a bargain of $2,500… You drop $40K in it, and when you want to sell it, its $25K. thats about the time you wish you had spent the $40K on the same size Barrel Back! If you are buying a boat and the seller is smoking crack, you can use the objective guide to break the ice. Enjoy diving in and learning about pricing.

You might like...
« « Previous Post         |         Next Post » »
8 Responses to “Ever Wonder What Your Boats Worth, Hagerty Has A Website For that.”
  1. Rick

    It gives me a number pretty close to what a broker said Panther was worth.

  2. Troy

    It is a great resource.

    Prices are all over the place and so much these days falls into the category of “It’s worth what a buyer will pay and a seller will sell it for.”

    I still like the idea of buying a boat that needs work, but have learned that the real savings is letting someone else do the big restore and than buy it for less since that is the market price.

  3. Al Benton

    Although the Hagerty price guide doesn’t have samples of all of the classic models they enough to give a buyer/seller a reasonable cost range for most runabouts and utilities.

    There are no 1966 Super Sports for example, and not too many models close enough to compare as apples to apples. However, there are other older models from the 50’s and early 60’s of “utility” class (or open floor plan) models to compare and get you somewhat in the ballpark on value.

    It’s a great tool for someone who is looking to sell, buy, trade, or who is looking for “agreed value” when purchasing insurance.

  4. Gary

    It is good but there are no guidelines on how to deal with engines or trailers. For cars they have gone the extra to cover engines when there are specials.

  5. Randy

    … a good start. Next to come — cruisers and classic glass (all of which they cover and have insured values for)?

    Thanks Hagerty!!!!!

    • Troy

      I was thinking it would be nice to have Cruisers, than I thought about the VAST difference in their values.

      Talk about a boat being worth what a buyer will pay for it. I know now I could have bought mine for about 25% less than I did, but I still think it was a good buy.

      • Rick

        Ok, with classic cruisers are we talking about how much you would pay for them or how much you have to pay someone to take them?