Chief Wannabuyaboat!

This wonderful brochure for the 1942 Sportsman Show in Boston is a great little time capsule of what it was like to be a “guy” right at the start of WWII. It’s also a reminder of how deeply embedded our minds are regarding comfort food and life in general.

Now this is a REAL breakfast. Bacon and Coffee.

Here is a cover from the 1939 Show. This actually makes more sense. An Indian Scout. During WW1 and WW2 these Native American Scouts made a HUGE contribution to the war effort. And the Navajo Code Talkers story is even cooler. But back to this ad for Sweeco! And Marshmallow Fluff

And then you have this ad. “Hey guys, Great hunting, you really killed that bear. Who wants Cocoa? And some Marshmallow Fluff?”

By the way, this is the type of boat that was being produced in 1942!

Okay, and these were the last of the pre war series from Chris Craft

And of course it all comes back to Bacon! Hey this is my theory.

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10 Responses to “Marshmallow Fluff Anyone?”
    • Troy in ANE

      I always thought that was the princesses name in Star Wars!

      Who can resist a girl with a big gun?

      (Image may be subject to copyrights)

      Reply
  1. Wilson

    I’m still looking for tht Army U-22 to pull in the parade behind a WW II Jeep. Would make a great combination

    Reply
  2. m-fine

    Mmmmm bacon!

    Was the ad for the 1942 show done before December 7 1941? Seems like most of the vendors would have been focusing on a switch to war production by February leaving the event as a showcase of products you can no longer buy.

    Reply
  3. Matt

    That’s an interesting thought. It says copyright 1942. And I know back in the day the lead time for printing was not as quick as today. I would imagine that the ads for the book were created in 1941 and used in this. None of the marketers were large corporate entities. I would imagine the show was a tad slow that year for sure. Knowing that most of the young men were off to war.

    Reply
  4. Rob

    WW II started in 1939. So the 1942 brochure came along well into the war, not “right at the start”.

    Reply

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