That little sucker is in! And yes, we used a little grease to make it stick.

Well, that was rather un dramatic, and sorry no cursing, or broken things. We only lost another lock key for about ten minutes, but I got small and went in the block to find it. But it was a fun morning in the barn with great pals who came by to share the joy of a quiet morning with a wrench in your hand.

I didnt say what sort of grease? HA. Need fuel to start the morning. Jimmy always shows up with a pile of these. All homemade at Little River Market in Burgess

Some had asked about what sort of spring compression tool we used. Here ya go. Thanks to VanNess Engeneering for the loan.

I just liked this photo. Hey, sometimes its about the art of the tool

This is the valve seat grinder tool

Jimmy getting ready

Lets get busy. Spring compressed and locks in. That’s it. No drama

Time to clean the head. Poor head, it’s been removed so many times, it should have been in the French revolution…. To obscure? mmmm, gotta go back to highschool history… Think “Let them eat cake”

Cleaning

Cleaned up and ready

Gotta make a Valve Cover Gasket

The shape

Done! Coated with some High heat Permatex

Wayne torquing.. not tweaking…that was later..

Head on! She started right up. Even compression on all cylinders. Thats it?

Cleaned up.

Gotta take the chance to clean her up for the rest of the summer.

Next weekend we get her in the water and GO BOATING! A huge thanks to Dave VanNess for the over the phone help, and tools and parts, Jimmy and Wayne for help and all our readers for the fun comments. It’s fun to share the joys and pains of this all.

 

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15 Responses to “Classic Boat Valve Seat Replacement Without Pulling The Engine – Part 2”
  1. Fred

    Matt, get yourself one of these for next time. 4 on eBay now. New Britain VL 139

  2. John Rothert

    Success…..back to the French:

    celebrate….”let them eat cake”…..

    John in Va.

    Just back from Going Boating!

  3. Les Best

    Have the spring compressor and the keeper installing tool too.

  4. Briant

    I can just see the facial expressions of your local Mercruiser V8 powerplant sellers….sly grins….

    Dude #1…saying, “oh, he got lucky this time, but we will see him real soon.”

    Dude #2…”damn straight.”

  5. m-fine

    The V8 doesn’t need to be a Mercruiser, and even if it is we can paint it Chris Craft Blue for him. Heck, Matt can choose between the pre-war, post war, or post war V8 blues.

    Easier starting, more reliable, fresh water cooled and at least 50% more hp. It is the perfect choice to delay the inevitable pontoon purchase that is in Matt’s future if he sticks to running old flat heads in brackish water!

  6. Dan T

    That old W is a beautiful chunk of iron and still going after 70 years. Nice backyard repair!

  7. floyd r turbo

    Blasphemy, talkin’ about replacing that engine. Go get another boat that doesn’t have the great history that this one has, do a 5200 or epoxy bottom and a veneered hull or 5200 sides and deck and put your Mercruiser, Crusader, hot rod 454 or 502 but don’t mess with this well maintained piece of history.

  8. Mark in da U P

    SUCCESS!! Now you have to Flo test it. Is it still called the trusty W?