The best parts in these parts.

Want to become a true fixture in the Classic boat universe? Today is your chance to start your journey, you, a fellow Woody Boater could own and craft the hardest thing to find in our passion. Parts. Wood can be remade, hard parts. No. There is not an infinite number out there of these parts, well, in these parts of the universe. Only so many cleats, lights, plates.. the list goes on.

Racks and Rack and racks of impossible to reproduce molds.

One, and in most cases the only one source is California Classic Boat Parts, and the King of it all Al Schinnerer. Al is retiring early at age 95. 30 years after 99% of us slobs start eating the early bird special and complaining about kids on our lawn, Al, has been molding and making our passion a better and more fulfilling place.

Wheels, windshield molds, if you can think of it, they have made it.

Are you up for the gig? The throne? To be at the top of the Chrome Mountain? Needless to say, you are never to young to start a new job? Hell Al has spent more time doing this, than many do in a lifetime.

Al in 2015

Maybe, it isn’t Al? mmmm makes you think long and hard? maybe it’s not really Al, we all love and care about, maybe he reproduced himself? I am sure, okay sure-ish, you may find an Al Schinnerer mold on a rack. Maybe an AL, mask..

Al, last week. Someone needs to check and see if Al is real or ?

Actually there is a mold of Al’s original face, made in 1983. Yup, turns out there have been 2 Al’s since then. Here at WoodyBoater we find out all the details. All…… and  AL, this is included in the deal by the way.

So, you are interested? Here are some of the details. A Bazillion Dollars worth of Molds, inventory, name awareness, good standing, and great brand, all of it for an asking price of $75K, which is less than restoring a boat, or a Railway for example. Give Al a call, email whatever, Smoke signals? Carrier Pigeon? Signal Flags? Maybe a Telegram. Al has seen it all. And a great guy.

maybe one of the young ladies in the passion would like to take over? The mask is yours. Allie Schinnerer?????

You can find Al’s contact info at the Company Website. California Classic Boats HERE.

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17 Responses to “Mold the Future Of The Classic Boat Universe. Yup.. YOU?”
  1. Jim Staib

    No! Say it is not so. Al is too young to give it up. Young at heart at least. What are you going to do now Al? Go to Disneyland? I think that they are closed.
    Thanks for all you have done for the hobby. Whoever continues CCB will have big shoes to fill.

    • Wicked Wahine

      A true gentleman, An ageless wonder. Who or Whom ever takes over his business will have big shoes to fill.
      I’m very fortunate to call AL a friend. Thank you for all you have done in the Antique and Classic Boat World.

  2. Kelly Wittenauer

    Wow, hope someone picks this up & continues this art! That photo of Al at 95 & mask mold from 38 years ago?! I need to learn his secret for avoiding aging.

  3. Paul H.

    A perfect new division for Matt to add to his burgeoning SmithGifford stable, with world headquarters moving from CA to Reedville? An appropriate setting for it, I must say.

  4. Jim G

    Matt’s got plenty of room at the railway yard. One of those buildings would be perfect for a metal casting business.

    Besides Virginia can’t have near the amount of over bearing regulations that California has on that type of business.

  5. Art

    There is n outfit in Algonac, Algonac Marine Cast hardware co, that our Michigan ACBS chapter toured 6 years ago. It originally was the Algonac Foundry that casted most of the hardware for Chris Craft and many other boat manufactures. They have trillions—well maybe just 10 thousand or so castings, I lost count. They are still in business and their catalog shows many of the parts we need.

  6. Mark in da U P

    I agree with Paul and Jim. Go for it Matt. Expand the empire! Use a daisy chain to ge all the equipment to Reedville. Go Big!

  7. floyd r turbo

    An ageless wonder. And doesn’t he still own Miss Arrowhead? I think there’s a lot more to this business than meets the eye but here’s a golden opportunity. Hope I can follow in his aging footstep (or transom wake).

  8. Ollon

    When I worked in Long Beach his shop was right down the street. It was always a treat to stop by and see Al. Always very gracious, helpful, and interesting and he really makes the best parts. Thank you Al for all your help and expertise. Enjoy.

  9. Curt Erickson

    A truly nice guy. Always helpful and has a genuine interest in your project. I met Al in the early 80’s at the Tahoe show where he always made me feel welcome. Best wishes in retirement.

  10. Dick Dow

    Echoing Curt here – I have met Al a few times over the years and always came away with a smile on my face and something new to consider about the hobby, for whatever my current project was or just “How does he do it?” Hopefully, someone will pick up where he is leaving off. Happy retirement, Al!

  11. Don Palmer

    OK, here is a thought… Perhaps all of us Woody Boaters should put together a “Go Fund Me” for Matt so he can buy the business… that is of course unless Matt says OH HECK NO!

  12. Dick Hansen

    What an inspiration Al is! I would sure love to see a young person take over this business here in southern California. Seems like a bargain price for all of the hard assets and goodwill.

  13. John Peckham

    Al is a great guy! He’s let me use is shop while I’ve been restoring my boat. He has great advice and is a walking wealth of knowledge. He’s shared some funny stories with me while we’ve made parts. Lots of great lunches together at Curleys

  14. steve bunda

    I would be interested if Al’s Fountain of youth came with it . How rare is the boat he is working on in the header picture?

    • Greg W

      Looks like Miss Arrowhead, 1940 27 special race. Last I heard currently owned by Dana Mecum.

  15. Clay at Cross Lake

    Don Palmer – Great idea! Matt you can put me down for a “Go Fund Me” contribution if you have a spare corner in one of those shop buildings for a casting area. No better way to keepsake those precious moulds.